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🌟"Let Christ's light shine upon you" - Ephesians 5:14🌟Ring in 2024 with Light and Blessings! Find the Perfect Paschal Candle: Order Now for On-Time Delivery to Your Parish!
🌟"Let Christ's light shine upon you" - Ephesians 5:14🌟Ring in 2024 with Light and Blessings! Find the Perfect Paschal Candle: Order Now for On-Time Delivery to Your Parish!

10" Our Lady of Guadalupe Bust Marco Sevelli Plaque

Original price $59.95 - Original price $59.95
Original price
$59.95
$59.95 - $59.95
Current price $59.95

Description:

An exquisite image of Our Lady of Guadalupe Bust Marco Sevelli Plaque offers new and distinctive art sculptures. The beautiful faces, traditional colors, and delicate attention to detail, together with a price that cannot be beaten in the marketplace. This plaque meticulously, hand painted every little detail of color pallete. The artists' skill and attention to artwork make this statue a truly amazing work of art worthy of enhancing your home. Each is securely but elegantly packaged in a gift box.

Item No.: ST-WC158

Features:

  • 10" Our Lady of Guadalupe Bust Marco Sevelli Plaque
  • Patron Saint of Mexico and the Continental Americas
  • Hand-made from the finest quality polyresin.
  • Size: 8" X 10"
  • The natural stone finish will be treasured for years to come.
  • The plaque is securely but elegantly packaged in a gift box.
  • Comes with a scrolled wire stand for tabletop use and a keyhole hanger for the wall

Story & Symbolism: 

Our Lady of Guadalupe first identified herself as Mother of God and Mother of all mankind when she appears on the Tepeyac Hill in Mexico in 1531. An indigenous peasant, Juan Diego, saw a brilliant figure on the hill. After that, Juan Diego visited Juan de Zumárraga, who was the archbishop of what is now Mexico City. Zumárraga rejected him in disbelief and asked the future Saint to provide proof of his story and proof of the identity of the Lady.

Miracle:

The first apparition occurred on the morning of December 9, 1531 (on the Julian calendar, which would be December 19 on the Gregorian calendar used today), when it is said that a native Mexican peasant named Juan Diego experienced a vision of a young woman at a place called the Hill of Tepeyac, which would become part of Villa de Guadalupe, in a suburb of Mexico City.